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Russellj

Suspension 'jiggle' after pothole encounter?

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I hit a pothole with the nearside front wheel of my 16 plate estate recently and am now musing over a perception of a possible change in driving characteristics since then.

 

The car still steers and brakes fine, and there’s no steering wheel shake (as I’ve had with previous cars when a wheel needs balancing).  And on (rare perfectly) smooth motorway surfaces, the car is fine and feels as smooth as it used to (e.g. feels nicely damped over longer undulations).

 

However, what I’m noticing is that when driving over the usual surface imperfections (expansion gaps in motorway sections, ripples, bumps, etc) is that the car feels more "jiggly" or unsettled.  It feels like the car takes a bit longer to recover from encountering minor imperfections than it used to.  The closest analogy is that when you poke a jelly it wobbles, and continues to, for a while afterwards.  It feels like the car is no longer damping these wobbles after hitting a bump as quickly as it used to (or maybe it’s started to wobble when it didn’t used to?).  Ultimately, the car just feel more "fidgety" and unsettled than it used to when driving over less than perfect surfaces.

 

It’s not a major thing.  The car doesn’t feel unsafe.  And it may just entirely be in my imagination!!

 

The car has adaptive suspension (DCC).  I pretty much leave it in Comfort mode most of the time, and haven’t changed mode or the roads I’m driving recently, so that won’t be the cause.

 

The car has been for a 20k service since the pothole and I asked them to take a look.  They couldn't see anything untoward and the guy who collected/returned the vehicle (20 min drive each way) didn't think there was anything unusual. (Suspect he was too busy enjoying the drive 😀).

 

Maybe it's just one of those things that once you notice it (or *think* you notice it) you can't stop picking up on?

 

Alternatively, are there any suspension components that might be out after a pothole encounter?  I've only done approx 1,000 miles since, so there's not been enough mileage to show up different tyre wear pattern (e.g. if alignment was out).  I did take it to a tyre place that does 4 wheel alignment, but after asking some questions re: symptoms, the guy didn't want to take my money, and told me not to worry.

 

To make it worse, I went for a drive in my neighbour's M135i a couple of days ago and it seemed as smooth as mine over good surfaces, but without the jiggle over imperfections as I'm reporting here 😒

 

Would be grateful for any thoughts or previous experience on the above (besides "just ignore it") 😀

 

Thanks!

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Hallo. Didn't find anything. But still have the same perception. Friend of mine who borrowed the car reports it being most apparent around 80-85mph (wouldn't be me as I never exceed 70) 😀

 

Cars now on 37k miles and due 4 new tyres very shortly, so am wondering/hoping that maybe balance may be out and problem goes away. Tyres haven't worn oddly so it shouldn't be tracking.

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8 hours ago, Russellj said:

Hallo. Didn't find anything. But still have the same perception. Friend of mine who borrowed the car reports it being most apparent around 80-85mph (wouldn't be me as I never exceed 70) 1f600.png

 

Cars now on 37k miles and due 4 new tyres very shortly, so am wondering/hoping that maybe balance may be out and problem goes away. Tyres haven't worn oddly so it shouldn't be tracking.

Hi, thanks for that. Maybe it is just a perception thing then. But sounds like not. I guess it could be a bit of wear on the shocks? 

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I hit a pothole with the nearside front wheel of my 16 plate estate recently and am now musing over a perception of a possible change in driving characteristics since then.
 
The car still steers and brakes fine, and there’s no steering wheel shake (as I’ve had with previous cars when a wheel needs balancing).  And on (rare perfectly) smooth motorway surfaces, the car is fine and feels as smooth as it used to (e.g. feels nicely damped over longer undulations).
 
However, what I’m noticing is that when driving over the usual surface imperfections (expansion gaps in motorway sections, ripples, bumps, etc) is that the car feels more "jiggly" or unsettled.  It feels like the car takes a bit longer to recover from encountering minor imperfections than it used to.  The closest analogy is that when you poke a jelly it wobbles, and continues to, for a while afterwards.  It feels like the car is no longer damping these wobbles after hitting a bump as quickly as it used to (or maybe it’s started to wobble when it didn’t used to?).  Ultimately, the car just feel more "fidgety" and unsettled than it used to when driving over less than perfect surfaces.
 
It’s not a major thing.  The car doesn’t feel unsafe.  And it may just entirely be in my imagination!!
 
The car has adaptive suspension (DCC).  I pretty much leave it in Comfort mode most of the time, and haven’t changed mode or the roads I’m driving recently, so that won’t be the cause.
 
The car has been for a 20k service since the pothole and I asked them to take a look.  They couldn't see anything untoward and the guy who collected/returned the vehicle (20 min drive each way) didn't think there was anything unusual. (Suspect he was too busy enjoying the drive ).
 
Maybe it's just one of those things that once you notice it (or *think* you notice it) you can't stop picking up on?
 
Alternatively, are there any suspension components that might be out after a pothole encounter?  I've only done approx 1,000 miles since, so there's not been enough mileage to show up different tyre wear pattern (e.g. if alignment was out).  I did take it to a tyre place that does 4 wheel alignment, but after asking some questions re: symptoms, the guy didn't want to take my money, and told me not to worry.
 
To make it worse, I went for a drive in my neighbour's M135i a couple of days ago and it seemed as smooth as mine over good surfaces, but without the jiggle over imperfections as I'm reporting here
 
Would be grateful for any thoughts or previous experience on the above (besides "just ignore it")
 
Thanks!
I am having the exact same issue as you have mentioned. I am guessing you haven't managed to find what is causing the issue?

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Nope. Car is now on 42k miles, has had four new tyres and Hunter 4 wheel alignment performed. Possibly *slightly* better but that niggling feeling that it just aint as smooth as it originally was is still there 😒

 

From reading other posts, I wonder whether suspension top mounts might be worth replacing, as some people report similar symptoms that can be resolved after this. Doesn’t seem too expensive to do. But then again, it doesn’t seem guaranteed and some continue replacing most of the rest of the suspension in an effort to fix.

 

It’s a real pain as the car was just *so* smooth, and still is some of the time!

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Nope. Car is now on 42k miles, has had four new tyres and Hunter 4 wheel alignment performed. Possibly *slightly* better but that niggling feeling that it just aint as smooth as it originally was is still there 
 
From reading other posts, I wonder whether suspension top mounts might be worth replacing, as some people report similar symptoms that can be resolved after this. Doesn’t seem too expensive to do. But then again, it doesn’t seem guaranteed and some continue replacing most of the rest of the suspension in an effort to fix.
 
It’s a real pain as the car was just *so* smooth, and still is some of the time!
Can I see where you have read this? I wouldnt of thought top mounts could cause the issue


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I don’t have any links to hand but I recall googling and/or searching on here for suspension jiggle/unsettle etc and found some posts that flagged this as a possibility. My perception is that these have been a weak point on this and previous Golf generations.

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Just an update to close this thread off, in case it’s of use to anyone else in future...

 

The front suspension bushes were replaced last week and that seems to have restored the smoothness. At least I couldn’t tell a difference between my car afterwards and the loaner 999cc base spec Golf (with regard to smoothness of ride 😀).

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