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Jedi1971

Winter Tyres

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So to avoid using my decent tyres & prets over the winter have put on my 18's with their Dunlop SP Winters, these are on their 4th year on a golf still plenty of tread just don't feel the same as previous years  a little slippery and not so much traction as the summer std' s in current conditions Do tyres have a shelf life ?????  

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14 minutes ago, Jedi1971 said:

So to avoid using my decent tyres & prets over the winter have put on my 18's with their Dunlop SP Winters, these are on their 4th year on a golf still plenty of tread just don't feel the same as previous years  a little slippery and not so much traction as the summer std' s in current conditions Do tyres have a shelf life ?????  

Definitely.  Old tyres go hard and lose their grip.  Most tyre manufacturers recommend removing tyres that are more than 5 years old.  I don't know whether some of the new compounds are more or less susceptible to losing grip with age.  I think I've read that some track-only tyres lose significant grip afte a set number of heat cycles (1 heat cycle is warm up, cool down).  Personally I tend to replace tyres after 3-4 years of use, so I mostly replace tyres that have plenty of tread left.

 

The PS4 tyres on my vRS seem to have noticeably less grip on wet roads at 4 years old than they did when new, and they still have lots of tread.

 

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Hi Jedi,

I've used winter tyres for years now and they just don't perform unless it's cold, apparently they contain more silicon to let the tyre flex / grip in cold (below 7 degrees). I put them on a few weeks ago after all the press panic and sometimes it's hard work if the temp is above 7 which it has been.

One year I left a pair on the back of my A45 to wear out into spring but it was f....g impossible to drive so as the temps climbed I had to chuck them away.

Roll on the snow ❄️❄️

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Good thread, thanks for the explanations. I put winters on for the first time a few weeks ago. I thought I was imagining that they seems quite a bit squiffier in corners than my worn Goodyear Asys. Sounds like it's been too warm for them to perform properly. I mulled over getting them for ages and ages and finally took the plunge. I'll prob swap them on late Dec next year rather than mid Nov.

 

i don't do a lot of miles anyway, I'd prob be a good candidate for not bothering with them as I work at home, but I've taken the plunge now so hey ho.

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Mine are going on this next week, looking at the temps.  I tend to swap at about 5 degrees.

 

General consensus from manufacturers and road organisations is that if you're only running one tyre year round, winters are the one to pick, as they're less bad in summer than summers are in winter.  Obviously everyone ignores that because they think winters are only for snow. 

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Mine are going on this next week, looking at the temps.  I tend to swap at about 5 degrees.
 
General consensus from manufacturers and road organisations is that if you're only running one tyre year round, winters are the one to pick, as they're less bad in summer than summers are in winter.  Obviously everyone ignores that because they think winters are only for snow. 
Really? Most articles I have read have said proper winter tyres are awful over 6 degrees and quite dangerous... never run them myself but just going on what I have read. Surely if you only want to run one tyre all year you are better of with summers or better still all year ones like cross climates, well unless you live in a very cold country

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

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tyres are date stamped when new, your tyres will have a DOT code on the outside edge - it will say DOT followed by 4 digits, the first 2 digits are for the week and the second 2 digits are for the year so DOT 3416 will be week 34 2016 as an example.

As previously mentioned older tyres dry up and go hard as the oils dry from within the rubber, a sign also is perishing and cracking, this is mostly seen on low mileage FWD rear tyres that are just purely trailing tyres, if you look at the outer edge they will give a kind of crazed effect through cracking, cracking also appears between the treads on the surface but is harder to spot unless the tyre is physically off the wheel.

 

One thing also worth noting is the storage of tyres when not in use, ideally tyres need to be standing up side by side and not stacked up on top of each other.

 

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4 hours ago, Degsy said:

 

One thing also worth noting is the storage of tyres when not in use, ideally tyres need to be standing up side by side and not stacked up on top of each other.

 

What is the reason for this, have always stacked mine up!!

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Stacking
Tire experts recommend that tires be stored vertically, or upright, on their treads to minimize stress and tire distortion. If tires must be stored horizontally, tires should be stacked flat so that the bottom tire will maintain its shape.

Do not stack too many tires on top of each other. Too much weight can distort and damage the bottom tire. Be sure to allow air to circulate around all sides of the tires, including underneath.

It is advisable, especially for long-term storage, to wrap tires in coverings made especially for tire storage that guard against environmental damage. These are available from most truck tire retailers.

If mounted tires are to be stored, they should be maintained at a pressure of 10 psi.

Keep in mind that the longer the storage period, the greater exposure there is to potential damage. Always use first the tires that have been in storage the longest.

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On 12/01/2019 at 10:17, Baldchap said:

Mine are going on this next week, looking at the temps.  I tend to swap at about 5 degrees.

 

General consensus from manufacturers and road organisations is that if you're only running one tyre year round, winters are the one to pick, as they're less bad in summer than summers are in winter.  Obviously everyone ignores that because they think winters are only for snow. 

Michelin Cross Climate Plus and Continental Allseasoncontact have changed all this. 

 

Read the detailed articles in 2 recent editions of Auto Express. 

 

Michelin Cross Climate plus is a "summer tyre with excellent winter capability, particularly in snow" 

 

 

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